CSG news update -- 2006-09-04

From China Study Group <chinastudygroup@gmail.com>
Date Mon, 4 Sep 2006 02:00:30 -0700



China Study Group news update

Beijing's upmarket hotels consume half of residential power
http://english.people.com.cn/200609/03/eng20060903_299262.html
Xinhua | 2006-09-03
Almost half of the electricity used in Beijing's residential buildings is consumed by 311 hotels rated three stars or more, accounting for just 5.4 percent of residential floor area.  The statistic was released by Chen Huaiwei, director of the energy conservation center of the municipal commis...

Capital 'invasion' sparks concern
http://www.greenleft.org.au/back/2006/682/682p20.htm
Green Left Weekly | 2006-09-03
Eva Cheng
The consolidation of private capital in China at the expense of the state sector has taken another significant leap forward. "Mergers and acquisitions" (M&A) among Chinese companies and the gobbling up of Chinese entities by foreign capital reached a new high of US$41 billion during the six months t...

The World According to China
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/03/magazine/03ambassador.html
New York Times | 2006-09-03
James Traub
In Late July, as the United Nations Security Council argued long into the night over the wording of a so-called presidential statement castigating Israel for the bombing attack that killed four U.N. observers in southern Lebanon, Wang Guangya, the Chinese ambassador, blew his stack. This was almost ...

As China Spews Pollution, Villagers Rise Up
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-enviro3sep03,1,687961.story?coll=la-headlines-world
LA Times | 2006-09-03
Mark Magnier
HUASHUI, China  The tents are gone, the protesters have dispersed and the police have retreated to the shadows. But villagers remain in jail, local women are still tending deformed babies, and rage burns beneath the surface.  With the spread of pollution-related unrest, a contagious source ...

Where's Mao? Chinese Revise History Books
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/01/world/asia/01china.html
New York Times | 2006-09-01
Joseph Kahn
When high school students in Shanghai crack their history textbooks this fall they may be in for a surprise. The new standard world history text drops wars, dynasties and Communist revolutions in favor of colorful tutorials on economics, technology, social customs and globalization.  Socialism has...