~e; cartographic infrastructure critical

From bc <human@electronetwork.org>
Date Fri, 7 Dec 2001 22:57:39 -0600





  [interesting cartography project, surprised it has not been done yet, and the
  example cited (relating a train-crash to internet-outage) is an interesting
  dynamic. thing is, i hope that the basic, public aspects remain public, and
  that this .gov project has depth that is not necessary for basic knowledge.
  for example, a multilinear map of how information systems (transport,
  energy, communications) relate to eachother could assist in understanding
  these systems better, gaining knowledge. but if such info is off limits to
  basic educational explorations, then it would be of great concern. so hoping
  that drawing a map of infrastructure (power/media/tech, for example) is
  not a relegated to nefarious matters. as there is a great opportunity to learn
  more about our electromagnetic environment, and mapping and cartography
  are a primary means for enabling people to 'see' things like the Internet by
  visiting a supercomputer center, a network farm, a powerplant, etc. and
  if such things were on a public map, well, no question it may seem odd, but
  knowing the environment one lives within is a great resource to learning
  about how these infrastructures work. critical, public knowledge of it is.]

Gov't To Map Infrastructure
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/cmp/20011207/tc/inw20011206s0001_1.html

Thursday December 06 12:13 PM EST Gov't To Map Infrastructure

Gov't To Map Infrastructure

By Rutrell Yasin,

The federal government next month will begin mapping the links
between networks that control critical infrastructures to help
companies and government agencies react quickly to cyber and physical
threats.

Washington, D.C.--The federal government next month will begin
mapping the links between networks that control critical
infrastructures to help companies and government agencies react
quickly to cyber and physical threats.

The National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center will
provide a map of all the interdependent telecom and IT networks, gas
pipelines, railroad systems and electric power lines.

The map will help security analysts better understand the effect that
one part of the nation's infrastructure may have on another, said
Richard Clarke, special adviser for cybersecurity to President Bush

Clarke, who disclosed the plan this week, was appointed by Bush
following the Sept. 11 attacks to help the federal government and
commercial sectors better exchange information that would help combat
or react to cyberterrorism.

It was unclear how that information will be shared or made accessible, however.

"The center will create an acupuncture map of the country, so we will
know where to harden our protection," Clarke said.

Such a map, for example, could have helped IT managers determine how
a train derailment that caused a fire in a tunnel in Baltimore this
summer might have degraded Internet performance in Chicago. In that
case, the high-speed backbone connections running through the tunnel
were destroyed, though that wasn't apparent at the time.

There needs to be a national system through which IT managers can get
detailed information about viruses and attacks and quickly determine
how such developments might affect corporate IT environments, said
Jason Painter, corporate Webmaster at electronic component maker
Coherent.

Separately, Congress is considering legislation that would modify the
Freedom of Information Act so companies can share information with
the government about vulnerabilities without the risk that the
information will be subject to public exposure. Clarke said he hopes
this legislation will be passed before Congress adjourns for the
holidays this month.

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